Moodle Plugins

Five things you probably didn’t know about Moodle Plugins.

The M in Moodle stands for Modular, and one of the great benefits of Moodle is that if its many standard features aren’t enough for you, you can search over a thousand additional plugins to find what you need – for free!

Quick overview on Quiz
Happily, the Plugins directory is very well organised so if, for example, you are a fan of the powerful Quiz module, it’s easy for you to sift through the different question types, formats, reports and more. Did you know, for example, that you can require students to agree to a plagiarism statement before they begin a quiz, in a similar way to assignments? You can do this with the “honesty check” quiz access rule plugin.

Extending the power of the teacher with Availability conditions
Recent improvements in availability conditions have encouraged developers to contribute in this area too. Perhaps you have a course accessed by users with different native languages and you want an easy way to restrict activities in each language. Did you know about the Restriction by language plugin which lets you do just that? Read more about availability condition plugins here.

Update your course format
Most Moodlers are happy with Moodle’s standard weekly or topics course format, but if your users are particularly keen on Facebook or Twitter and you think having a more social media-like course might motivate their learning, you can have just that with the Socialwall course format. Explore the many useful contributed course formats here.

Gamification for engaging courses
Along with the social side of learning, gamification of courses is very popular these days. Did you know you can add a Level Up! block, allowing students to gain experience points and level up in their courses? Check out other handy blocks here.

What else is on offer?
A ‘local plugin’ is one that doesn’t fit into a particular area such as quiz or block. Did you know there is a local Moodle welcome plugin which sends a welcome message to a new user and alerts the admin at the same time when a user creates an account? Being made to feel welcome when you first join a course is good for your motivation, and it’s yet another example of how Moodle plugins support successful learning.

This article is taken from Moodle. 23.06.2018

Moodle 3.5

Moodle 3.5 has arrived, and we are currently testing it for compatibility with existing plugins.

An interesting feature that existed back in Moodle 3.1, but which seemed to mysteriously have disappeared was stealth topics. Moodle never admitted that this was a feature, in fact the developers considered it a bug and removed it from the application version 3.3 onward.

After considerable lobbying Moodle have agreed to reinstate this feature, but as an official feature this time. It is hoped that it will appear in one of the regular upgrades in 3.5 over the forthcoming weeks.

In the HT Moodle we have added two new formats which you may like to experiment with:

  1. Grid format
  2. Buttons format

Grid format allows you to create a course based on a series of tiles to form your menu, whereas Buttons format allows you to create a course based on buttons, numerical, alpha or roman numerals. You can also create subsections etc.

For further information please send an inquiry to Paul Raper who will be glad to explain these features in more detail.